Sunday, May 28, 2006

Nasturtiums

These are all volunteers. They come in so many colors, are edible, and attract beneficial insects. A must in your vegetable garden.

Orange Creamsicle
(I am making up most of the names, so don't go looking for them in the store)


Cherries Jubilee
..........my favorite color (and mounding type)


Blood Red (with black near the center)........amazing........don't remember ever seeing this color before in my garden. It's growing out of our french drain.


Pale Yellow
(love the foliage color, a little more grey/silver to it)


Orange (I don't care for this color, and I usually pull it out at first bloom, unless it volunteers in a charming place like this, then I let it grow.


This batch comes up every year, to conveniently cover this ugly wall behind my trellis. Just as my annuals take off up the trellis, the nasturtium are dying off, so I let it go.

6 Comments:

At 4:08 AM, Blogger Carol said...

Beautiful Nasturtiums! I've sown some other than the usual orange ones too this year. They are called Strawberry Ice, Black Velvet and Milkmaid. Can't wait to see them bloom now. You are very much ahead of us here in the North of Germany.

 
At 4:33 PM, Blogger snappy said...

you have the most fantastic range of nasturtiums.I have some growing but like carol's mine are loads behind yours.I have some in the border and some in a pot by the backdoor.What do you eat them with?for?in salad?the flowers or leafs?

 
At 7:41 PM, Blogger rachelle said...

i love reading your posts because i, in michigan, am far behind you and look forward to seeing what my garden might look like if i keep my fingers crossed.
snappy...nasturtiums have a peppery/pickily flavour, not dissimilar to watercress. i use them sparingly in salads, and the entire plant is edible. including the seeds, which you may grind fresh like pepper, or pickle them, which i hear is superior to capers.

 
At 2:02 PM, Blogger Jeanne said...

I add them to salads, like any edible flower. They don't really add to the flavor, just a nice visual effect.

 
At 6:33 PM, Blogger Ogie said...

I make a nasturtium vinegar using spent blossoms ans slightly bruised fresh blossoms. I heat a delicate rice wine vinegar to just below boiling and pour it over the bruised blossoms. I leave it to macerate until completely cooled, and the vinegar has picked up a translucent jewel tone, then strain, pour into a new bottle and seal. It is wonderful mixed with a little mayo as a dressing, but I love it best with a lite olive oil and freshly toasted sesame seeds. On a salad of fresh baby mache with a few nasturtium blossoms, it is bliss in the mouth!

 
At 6:34 PM, Blogger Ogie said...

I make a nasturtium vinegar using spent blossoms ans slightly bruised fresh blossoms. I heat a delicate rice wine vinegar to just below boiling and pour it over the bruised blossoms. I leave it to macerate until completely cooled, and the vinegar has picked up a translucent jewel tone, then strain, pour into a new bottle and seal. It is wonderful mixed with a little mayo as a dressing, but I love it best with a lite olive oil and freshly toasted sesame seeds. On a salad of fresh baby mache with a few nasturtium blossoms, it is bliss in the mouth!

 

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